.

Landmark Clinical LSD Study Nears Completion

The final subject in the first clinical LSD study since 1972 just completed his last treatment.

The first clinical LSD study on the planet in more than 35 years is almost complete. The Santa Cruz Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) is sponsoring this research, which began in 2008, when Swiss psychiatrist Peter Gasser, M.D., became the first medical researcher in the world to obtain government approval to do therapeutic research with LSD since 1972. 

Before 1972, nearly 700 studies with LSD and other psychedelic drugs were conducted. This research suggested that LSD has remarkable medical potential. LSD-assisted psychotherapy was shown to reduce the anxiety of terminal cancer patients, the drinking of alcoholics and the symptoms of many difficult-to-treat psychiatric illnesses.

For example, early LSD studies with advanced-stage cancer patients showed that LSD-assisted psychotherapy could alleviate symptoms of anxiety, tension, depression, sleep disturbances, psychological withdrawal and even severe physical pain. Other early investigators found that LSD may have some valuable potential as a means to facilitate creativity, problem-solving abilities and spiritual awareness.

Between 1972 and 1990 there were no government-approved human studies with any psychedelic drugs anywhere in the world. Their disappearance was no mystery. The worldwide ban on psychedelic drug research was the result of a political backlash that followed the promotion of these drugs by the counterculture of the 1960s. This reaction not only made these substances illegal for personal use, it also made it extremely difficult for medical researchers to obtain government approval to study them.

The situation began to change in 1990 when, according to MAPS president Rick Doblin, “open-minded regulators at the FDA decided to put science before politics when it came to psychedelic and medical marijuana research.” There are now more than a half-dozen clinical studies occurring worldwide that are examining the medical potential of psychedelic drugs.

Gasser’s almost-completed, MAPS-sponsored LSD study is being conducted in Switzerland, where LSD was discovered in 1943 by Albert Hofmann. The study examines how LSD-assisted psychotherapy affects the anxiety associated with suffering from an advanced, life-threatening illness. There are 12 subjects in the study with advanced-stage cancer and other serious illnesses. 

According to Gasser, so far the results look promising. Early researchers found that LSD-assisted psychotherapy has the incredible ability to help many people overcome their fear of death, and this is probably a major contributing factor in why the drug can be so profoundly helpful when people are facing a life-threatening illness.

On May 26, the final subject in Gasser’s study completed his last experimental therapy session. The clinical team at MAPS is now conducting a preliminary data analysis, finalizing the study’s database for the FDA and assisting Gasser in preparing a manuscript for publication.

MAPS is also sponsoring other medical research into the psychotherapeutic potential of psychedelic drugs, and more studies are on the way. The medical and therapeutic value of LSD and other psychedelic drugs appears to be quite substantial—although, personally, I’m really looking forward to the day when this research can go beyond its initial potential as a psychotherapeutic tool, as well as a spiritual aid, and delve into the mysteries of creativity, psychic phenomena and the possible reality of parallel universes and non-human entity contact.

Meanwhile, it seems like these mysterious substances hold enormous potential for treating numerous psychiatric disorders. Evidence suggests that they have the ability to help us treat post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, end-of-life anxiety, cluster headaches and other difficult-to-treat mental disorders—including, I suspect, the general neurosis that comes from simply being a human being.

To read the interview that I did with LSD researcher Peter Gasser, see: 

maps.org/news-letters/v20n1/v20n1-42to43.pdf

To find out more about MAPS and medical research into psychedelic drugs, see:maps.org

If you enjoy my column, and want to learn more about psychedelic and cannabis culture, “like” my Facebook page:

facebook.com/pages/David-Jay-Brown/115740098445882?ref=ts

and follow me on Twitter:

twitter.com/#!/DavidJayBrown

kenneth shultz June 01, 2011 at 04:25 PM
entheogenic substances like LSD or mushrooms may have the highest concentration of God within them than any other substance on this planet. This is why the powers that be would limit experimentation. It is a direct threat to organized religion, as well as the military industrial complex. Entheogenic thinking would make WAR NO MORE
Tristan June 01, 2011 at 07:54 PM
I really appreciate this article and of course the underlying studies -- MAPS is a great organization and I can't wait for the stigma on LSD (and other drugs) to lift. All that said, this article is in the public forum and as such needs to appear balanced and sane -- putting (frankly) stupid statements like: " I’m really looking forward to the day when this research delve into the mysteries of ... psychic phenomena and the possible reality of parallel universes and non-human entity contact." The entire credibility of the article, and even the studies themselves are called into question by the average reader when you use new-age, hippie cult-like BS like this -- stick to the science. I'm on "our" side -- but just watch the narrative.
Christine June 01, 2011 at 08:13 PM
I would just like to tell a real quick story about my experience with LSD. I had epicondylitis that was very painful and would not heal for almost a year. I took some LSD a few times with a friend and realized that my elbow wasnt hurting anymore. My friend had mentioned to me in a joking manner that it probably had heeling properties. I believe now that is does.
David Jay Brown June 01, 2011 at 08:17 PM
See the results of psychiatric researcher Rick Strassman's 5-year DMT study at the University of New Mexico, written up in his book *DMT: The Spirit Molecule*: www.amazon.com/DMT-Molecule-Revolutionary-Near-Death-Experiences/dp/0892819278 And Stanley Krippner and David Luke's review article: www.maps.org/news-letters/v21n1/v21n1-59to60.pdf
David Jay Brown June 01, 2011 at 08:17 PM
Many thanks for all the thoughtful comments!

Boards

More »
Got a question? Something on your mind? Talk to your community, directly.
Note Article
Just a short thought to get the word out quickly about anything in your neighborhood.
Share something with your neighbors.What's on your mind?What's on your mind?Make an announcement, speak your mind, or sell somethingPost something
See more »